About Us

Q. Do managers or supervisors need to be trained?
A. Yes. PUWER Regulations 1998 state that " all persons who supervise or manage the use of work equipment have received adequate training for the purpose of Health & Safety".

 

Q. Do trucks have to be inspected daily?
A. Yes. A qualified forklift operator must inspect forklifts at the start of every shift. (we can provide daily check sheets for equipment).

 

Q. Will one certificate cover an operator for all trucks?
A. No. Certification will only cover an operator for the piece of equipment that they have undergone training for. For instance a counterbalance licence will not cover an operator for a reach truck.

 

Q. Is there an age requirement for forklift operators?
A. Yes. Operators must be over the minimum school leaving age of 16, unless operating in dockyards where the age requirement is 18 or over.

 

Q. Can training be completed on our company premises?
A. Yes. On-site training is a good idea; it gives operators practice in the working environment. Sufficient room must be given for practical off job training.

 

Q. Do operators need a car driving licence?
A. No. A driving licence for a car is not needed unless forklifts are being driven on the road.

 

Q.  Do I legally have to train lift truck operators?

A. Yes.  The legislation covering this is the Health & Safety at Work Act, 1974, and Regulation 9 of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER).  In a nutshell this requires that every employer ensures that all persons who use lift trucks, as well as those that supervise them, have received adequate training.

 

Q.  Does a training qualification to drive a particular type of lift truck mean that the operator can drive any type of truck?

A.  Definitely not.  Any employer who allows an operator to drive workplace transport for which they have not received proper training puts the operator and the company at risk.  Conversion training, to enable operators to extend the range of trucks they are qualified to drive, makes sound business sense for most companies.  Please ask Mentor for details on what is involved.

 

Q.  Is it necessary to keep records for qualified and certificated operators in your employment?

A.  Most certainly. Mentor provides a service to its customers maintaining records of training on their behalf for a minimum of seven years.

 

Q.  When does a qualified operator’s certificate expire?

A.  It doesn’t.  This said it is increasingly common practise in British business to ensure that a companies health and safety standards are maintained by providing continuous refresher training - typically every two, three or five years.  Remedial training is recommended when an operator has caused an accident or near miss.

 

Q.  Do those who use pallet trucks need training?

A.  Yes, not least so that the employer complies with PUWER regulations (see above).  (A laden powered pallet truck can often weigh more than double the weight of a car.  Crushing accidents involving legs, feet and ankles are, sadly, commonplace).

 

Q. What determines the length of a workplace equipment training course?

A.  This is determined by the subject areas stipulated by the training accreditation bodies and the PUWER regulations.  Also, the delegate/trainer ratio and prior experience of the trainee which is laid down.  To buy training that promises qualified operators in less than these times is both false economy and extremely high risk.

 

Q.  If I train one person as an operator, can this person train and certify others?

A.  No

 

Q.  Do I legally have to train lift truck operators?

A. Yes.  The legislation covering this is the Health & Safety at Work Act, 1974, and Regulation 9 of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER).  In a nutshell this requires that every employer ensures that all persons who use lift trucks, as well as those that supervise them, have received adequate training.

 

Q.  Does a training qualification to drive a particular type of lift truck mean that the operator can drive any type of truck?

A.  Definitely not.  Any employer who allows an operator to drive workplace transport for which they have not received proper training puts the operator and the company at risk.  Conversion training, to enable operators to extend the range of trucks they are qualified to drive, makes sound business sense for most companies.  Please ask Mentor for details on what is involved.

 

Q.  Is it necessary to keep records for qualified and certificated operators in your employment?

A.  Most certainly. Mentor provides a service to its customers maintaining records of training on their behalf for a minimum of seven years.

 

Q.  When does a qualified operator’s certificate expire?

A.  It doesn’t.  This said it is increasingly common practise in British business to ensure that a companies health and safety standards are maintained by providing continuous refresher training - typically every two, three or five years.  Remedial training is recommended when an operator has caused an accident or near miss.

 

Q.  Do those who use pallet trucks need training?

A.  Yes, not least so that the employer complies with PUWER regulations (see above).  (A laden powered pallet truck can often weigh more than double the weight of a car.  Crushing accidents involving legs, feet and ankles are, sadly, commonplace).

 

Q. What determines the length of a workplace equipment training course?

A.  This is determined by the subject areas stipulated by the training accreditation bodies and the PUWER regulations.  Also, the delegate/trainer ratio and prior experience of the trainee which is laid down.  To buy training that promises qualified operators in less than these times is both false economy and extremely high risk.

 

Q.  If I train one person as an operator, can this person train and certify others?

A.  No

 

Q. What Will I Need For You To Be Able To Train At My Premises?

A. All that we require for on site training is the following:

  • A safe reliable truck for the duration of the course
  • A flat area for steering exercises inside or out
  • A safe area set aside from the main working area and preferably under cover
  • A supply of empty pallets uniform in size
  • 2 or 3 realistic loads
  • An office or room to carry out the theory element of the course

 

Q. What Forklift Training Courses Do You Offer?

A. We can train your staff on any type of forklift truck and many other types of material handling equipment including cranes and MEWPs. Training courses tend to fall into four main categories for:

  • A Novice Operator – someone who has never operated a forklift truck before and never been certificated.
  • A Semi Experienced Operator – someone who has operated a forklift for a minimum of 3 years, is competent but never been certificated.
  • A Refresher – someone who has been certificated to operate a forklift truck but needs to be brought up to date with current regulations.
  • A Conversion – someone who has been certificated but now needs to drive a different type or different size forklift truck.

 

Q. What is manual handling?

A. The regulations define manual handling as any “any transporting or supporting of a load (including the lifting, putting down, pushing, pulling, carrying or moving thereof) by hand or by bodily force”. In effect, any activity that requires an individual to lift, move or support a load will be classified as a manual handling task.

 

Q. Why is manual handling important?

A. More than a third of all reportable injuries of over three days involve manual handling and around 10% of major injuries are linked to manual handling. It has a major impact on all workplaces and costs the economy hundreds of millions of pounds every year.

In the UK 1.1 million people reported that they suffered from musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) caused or made worse by work. It is estimated 12.3 million working days are lost annually due to work-related MSDs.

 

Q. Who is affected/most at risk from manual handling?

A. Anyone involved in the moving and handling of goods and people could be at risk. Injuries and suffering can be linked to any work involving handling of loads, even light loads of handled incorrectly. Risks can be found in all work sectors but healthcare, agriculture and construction are recognised as high risk industries due to the number and nature of the manual handling activities

 

Q. What are my responsibilities as an employer under the law?

A. Every employer must remove the need for employees to undertake hazardous manual handling activities. When this is not reasonably practically, steps must be taken to reduce the risk as much as possible. In order to achieve this a risk assessment must be written so that appropriate risk reductions measures can be implemented.

The employer also has the duty to, when possible, provide information about the load. This includes the total weight of each load and the heaviest side, if the centre of gravity is not positioned centrally.

 

Q. Do I need training to use a MEWP (Mobile Elevated Work Platform)?

A. It is your employer’s legal obligation to ensure that the operator of the equipment is trained; this is stated in the follows Regulations:

  • HSWA – The Health and Safety at Work Act (1974)
  • LOLER - The Lift Operating & Lifting Equipment Regulations (1998)
  • PUWER - The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (1998)
  • WAHR – The Working at Height Regulations (2005)

 
35 Years Experience
IOSH (Institution of Occupational Safety and Health)
NPORS (National Plant Operators Registration Scheme)
CIEH (The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health)